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Turmeric

Grow yer own!

Post Wed Dec 24, 2014 1:23 am
IdahoHerbalist Site Admin

Posts: 1119
Organic Turmeric and Ginger source from HI. Several varieties of each. One Turmeric claims 7.5% curcumin! Prices seem reasonable as well.

http://www.hawaiianorganicginger.com/

Post Thu Mar 05, 2015 5:29 pm

Posts: 33
I hope this is the right place to ask this question. I just received my lovely, golden tumeric root from Mountain Rose. I have had such great success with this herb for arthritis pain that I wanted to make my own extract. Any advice on the best way to do this? tincture with 80% vodka? Has anyone used a glycerin tinc for this? In the pain management section Doc Jones mentioned Boswelia with tumeric. Any one have experience with that?

Post Thu Mar 05, 2015 11:23 pm
IdahoHerbalist Site Admin

Posts: 1119
We make our turmeric tincture with 50% and a 1:3 ratio.

Doc has a joint formulation. I do not know all of the herbs in it but I am pretty sure it has Boswellia.

Post Sat Mar 07, 2015 2:02 am
Doc Jones User avatar
Site Admin

Posts: 1070
IdahoHerbalist wrote:
We make our turmeric tincture with 50% and a 1:3 ratio.

Doc has a joint formulation. I do not know all of the herbs in it but I am pretty sure it has Boswellia.



Turmeric and Boswellia (frankincense) have a wonderful, synergistic relationship for pain. They are both in my arthritis formula.

Doc

Post Wed Mar 11, 2015 4:07 pm

Posts: 33
Doc Jones wrote:
IdahoHerbalist wrote:
We make our turmeric tincture with 50% and a 1:3 ratio.

Doc has a joint formulation. I do not know all of the herbs in it but I am pretty sure it has Boswellia.



Turmeric and Boswellia (frankincense) have a wonderful, synergistic relationship for pain. They are both in my arthritis formula.

Doc


And what is your arthritis formula? praytell. :blob: Is that something I will see in future modules?

Post Wed Mar 11, 2015 11:13 pm
IdahoHerbalist Site Admin

Posts: 1119
cherig wrote:
And what is your arthritis formula? praytell. :blob: Is that something I will see in future modules?

SHHHHHHH, it is a secret!!!! :nod: Actually, I have found doc to be quite the sharer. I will let him share i though since selling the mixed herb is one way he makes money to support this forum.

Post Fri Mar 13, 2015 4:07 pm
Doc Jones User avatar
Site Admin

Posts: 1070
cherig wrote:
Doc Jones wrote:
IdahoHerbalist wrote:
We make our turmeric tincture with 50% and a 1:3 ratio.

Doc has a joint formulation. I do not know all of the herbs in it but I am pretty sure it has Boswellia.



Turmeric and Boswellia (frankincense) have a wonderful, synergistic relationship for pain. They are both in my arthritis formula.

Doc


And what is your arthritis formula? praytell. :blob: Is that something I will see in future modules?


Equal parts of the following would work well:

Boswellia
Burdock
Butcher's broom
Devil's Claw
Ginger
Turmeric
Black Cohosh

We'll be discussing arthritis in detail in a future module.

Doc

Post Sun Mar 15, 2015 5:03 pm

Posts: 33
Thanks. I look forward to the module. :notworthy:

Post Mon May 01, 2017 4:13 pm

Posts: 1
Sagewoman, where are you from? I'm in Southern Utah as well. I would like to find like minded people in the area to discuss the local herbs and plants.


SageWoman wrote:
Oooh, my eyes widened when I saw Honeyberry. Is that the fruiting honeysuckle that they grow in Canada and Russia? There's none here in Australia and I think I'd be pushing my luck to get that to grow. I tried them from seeds but wasn't successful. Yes, we ordered these about 8 years ago when they were in the news. They are still pretty scrubby, ranging from knee high to a little bigger. Last year we finally got a little fruit, but it is a lot of work to even pick a mouthful and the critters are so hungry for fruit as the snow is melting, that they usually beat us to it. The berries are small and blue and sour and high in antioxidents like blueberries. I keep telling my honeyberries that they better produce or they will be yanked out and planted where the deer can nibble on them. GASP! They are the first fruit to mature, though and it is nice to get a harvest at the end of May.

I'm a bit surprised that Comfrey grows in those conditions. Mine comes up half way through spring, so much later than some other plants. Then it dies back at the end of April with the first chill in the air. But that's still seven months of growing. And I didn't know delicate-looking St John's Wort could survive snow. It must be a much hardier cousin to mine. You've made me look at some of my plants with a new respect. We cut our comfrey for compost 3 times during the growing season. The roots are so deep it seems to do fine with the cold winters, and it starts peeking out even before the snow melts in the spring. I could probably go out now and brush away the snow and see little 3 inch leaves just waiting to pop up! St John's Wort also dies back and we trim off the dead stems. I really have to watch it or the flowering tops go brown and it is too late for me to harvest right when I'm mostly tending to my vegetables at the height of the summer.

Even Jerusalem artichoke is a surprise. Would some of the other Andean tubers, eg. maca, oca, grow in your area? I haven't tried any of these others. Jerusalem Artichoke is indigenous to North America and grows all along the highways in our area, so it was a natural to plant in our yard. It's a real survival food in hard times!

Your place sounds like a paradise. I can't imagine why people want to live at the ocean when the mountains are so beautiful with all the seasonal changing energies. It would be extra spectacular in winter. It is funny you would say that as I was born at sea level in San Diego, California and being a mountain woman has been a learning process. It is beautiful, and the air is bracing and clean. All of the 120 people who live here think we have gone to heaven!

It's possible that your plants would be more medicinal than the ones I grow. Mine have got an easy ride compared to yours. Your plants' survival under extreme conditions would have to reflect in their medicinal qualities.

I'm just thinking of a few "cold" herbs that might grow where you are.
Siberian Ginseng, maralroot, partridge berry, eyebright, edelweiss, hawthorn, linden, coptis, goji, corydalis, trillium, reishi mushroom. I can't even imagine the cold of your winters, so I could be barking up the wrong tree. You've given me something to think about, especially the adaptogens. They are few and far between here. Thanks for the suggestions!


Oh, I forgot the Turmeric!
The first year that I grew it, the stems were a little weak; even watering gently with a hose would break them. As the plants matured into two year olds, they sprang up in spring a lot tougher and started spreading out. I harvested a few and gave many away, and still have about double what I started with last year. I didn't have to dig them up in winter and they don't seem to mind a bit of rain when they're dormant. They are certainly beautiful and lush. Do you ever dry the roots, or just use them fresh as you need them?

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