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How does Chinese Medicine think about the mind-body connecti

Yin, Yang, Qi, fire in yer kidneys, snowballs in yer gizzard etc...

IdahoHerbalist User avatar
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-mVlOiXMYto

I did not watch, I do not understand this. Maybe Patrick will watch and chime in.

Doc Jones User avatar
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Chinese medicine makes no distinction between physical, mental and emotional ailments. They view the person as a "whole being" and the mind, body, spirit and emotions are merely different aspect of that being. They view these elements as being completely interconnected and treat all of them equally in their therapies.

For example, Chinese medicine believes that Chi (life energy) runs through the body along certain paths called meridians or vessels. Acupuncture is used to stimulate points along these meridians and remove blockages that interfere with the flow of the Chi.

There are "Ordinary Vessels" such as the heart meridian, the liver meridian etc that relate mostly to physical organs and functions. There are "Governing Vessels" which bridge the gap between physical and spiritual/emotional. And, there are "Extraordinary Vessels" which relate almost entirely to spiritual and emotional issues. However, all of the vessels can be used to treat all types of conditions. In other words, there are acupuncture points on the Ordinary Vessels that impact emotional things and points along the Extraordinary vessels that impact physical things. There is really no way to separate them in Chinese medicine.

For example, I treated a woman a week or so ago for a physical problem. She was also having a lot of stress and anxiety related to her job...lots of interpersonal conflict with other employees and feelings of inadequacy, frustration etc...

I did the treatment and she called me the next week to report that not only was her physical malady improved but that she also felt unusually energized, optimistic and empowered at work. You see, it was impossible for me to treat one without also treating the other...it's all the same thing.

Doc

Note: I don't do acupuncture on humans using needles. I don't have a license to poke needles into humans. I do occasionally use needles on my veterinay patients. When I use acupuncture points on humans, I use special tuning forks which actually, IMO, are much more versatile and powerful than needles anyway.


Posts: 18
... and Doc uses cups. I bought some at Amazon, since we live 6+ hours away from Doc. The cups are plastic in different sizes and you put them on the points that hurt. With the hand pump you pull out the air and let the skin rise a bit inside of the cup. Leave it on for a few minutes and it will "air out" the tissue below. I put them on the foot that is refusing to heal and those cups made a huge difference immediately. Great stuff. Thanks, Doc, that was a good idea you had :)

Doc Jones User avatar
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Dorothea wrote:
... and Doc uses cups. I bought some at Amazon, since we live 6+ hours away from Doc. The cups are plastic in different sizes and you put them on the points that hurt. With the hand pump you pull out the air and let the skin rise a bit inside of the cup. Leave it on for a few minutes and it will "air out" the tissue below. I put them on the foot that is refusing to heal and those cups made a huge difference immediately. Great stuff. Thanks, Doc, that was a good idea you had :)


Well...it was actually an idea some guy had about 5 thousand years ago... :roll:

In Asia they still use horns like in the old days. Yak horns and fire...what could go wrong? :)

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Posts: 216
About 20 years ago I did something similar for an infected spider bite on my thigh, using a glass bottle, heated with hot water, and applied a bag of frozen peas to the bottle. The vacuum sucked the pus out of the abscess, and it healed just fine after that.

Doc Jones User avatar
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Fundog wrote:
About 20 years ago I did something similar for an infected spider bite on my thigh, using a glass bottle, heated with hot water, and applied a bag of frozen peas to the bottle. The vacuum sucked the pus out of the abscess, and it healed just fine after that.


My dad said he used to use a pop bottle with a match in it to suck the pus out of boils and abscesses.

Doc


Posts: 2
Acupuncture is the origin of Chinese culture which is speedily garbing attention from the Western culture. Acupuncture is more than a therapy and a healing art. It is an effective and gentle method of healing and it does take commitment to continue with it. For a patient to maximise the benefits of acupuncture, he or she must undergo a series of acupuncture treatments. It is necessary to follow the instructions and precautions told by your acupuncturist for the better results.


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