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Yeast infection on dog

Using Herbs to Treat Animals

Post Sat Nov 19, 2016 7:52 pm

Posts: 4
We have a small 5 lb Pom that has a very bad yeast infection. We have cut out all grains and sugar but she still smells like fritos and itches. I bath her every 3 or 4 days and rinse her with ACV with a few drops of peppermint oil. we keep her hair trimmed short so it's easier to bath her. Any help with this would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks

Bill

Post Sun Nov 20, 2016 7:07 am

Posts: 217
Once you get the infection sorted out, I would recommend bathing less often. (I only bathe my dogs once or twice a year). Weekly bathing can mess up that delicate ph balance and actually invite pathogens onto the skin. If a dog rolls in the mud, you could just rinse off with clean water and not use soap. Save the strong detergents for rolling in something stinky or getting sprayed by a skunk.

The itchies tell me there is an allergen at work. Granted that you have her on grain free, but what do you feed? Chicken is actually a very common allergen in dogs. If you are feeding a chicken based commercial dog food, that could be the culprit, or a major contributor.

*Disclaimer:* I'm not Doc, and I'm not a veterinarian, but I am a very experienced and knowledgeable dog owner.

Post Wed Nov 23, 2016 7:02 pm
Doc Jones User avatar
Site Admin

Posts: 931
Fundog is right. Chronic ear issues are almost always secondary to an underlying allergy problem.

Allergies in dogs can be frustrating to treat herbally. Most dogs with allergies are allergic to a large number of plants, including herbs. So, treating them with herbs sometimes isn't effective.

Sometimes you get lucky and it's just a food allergy. In those cases, switching to a food with proteins the dog has never seen can help. Go to your local pet store and find something weird like lamb and rice or duck and potato or venison and pea. If that clears him up, you're all set.

You can make a tea of this formula (http://homegrownherbalist.net/collections/dry-herbs-formulas/products/infxn-fungal-topical) and use it as an ear wash for the bacterial/yeast infection but unless you address the underlying allergy, it will be a constant, miserable battle. Some of these kids just need to get on meds so they aren't miserable.


Some dogs show improvement with this formula: http://homegrownherbalist.net/collections/dry-herbs-formulas/products/histamine-support
internally twice a day

Doc

Post Wed Nov 23, 2016 10:35 pm

Posts: 4
Thanks for the replies. She doesn't have a ear issue. The yeast infection is on her underbelly, back, legs and feet. I will make the tea and use it for rinsing. Using apple cider vinegar to rinse her now and it helps a little. Is the black walnut the leaf or hull and is goldenseal leaf or root? I have the rest.

Post Thu Nov 24, 2016 2:28 am
Doc Jones User avatar
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Posts: 931
prestonbill wrote:
Thanks for the replies. She doesn't have a ear issue. The yeast infection is on her underbelly, back, legs and feet. I will make the tea and use it for rinsing. Using apple cider vinegar to rinse her now and it helps a little. Is the black walnut the leaf or hull and is goldenseal leaf or root? I have the rest.


Certainly allergies then.

Goldenseal is the root.
Black walnut is the hull.

Doc

Post Thu Nov 24, 2016 2:46 am
IdahoHerbalist User avatar
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Posts: 1055
Hull = husk, right? The outer fleshy part.

Post Thu Nov 24, 2016 2:49 am
Doc Jones User avatar
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Posts: 931
IdahoHerbalist wrote:
Hull = husk, right? The outer fleshy part.


Yup.

Hull=husk=outer fleshy part

Post Thu Nov 24, 2016 6:13 am

Posts: 4
Thank you very much. I will work on her diet to see if we can figure it out.

Bill

Post Sat Dec 24, 2016 7:50 pm

Posts: 13
It may be worth looking into beneficial microorganisims. Give it a Google and add in how to make or make your own. It's really simple. And essentially it is nothing more than culturing healthy microorganisims. Last year I made a batch for my garden and the cheese that is left over is full of healthy organisms that will expel/eradicate "unhealthy" ones...as does the liquid of course. But what I'm trying to get at is that last year I fed the cheese to my dog and the next day he expelled, from his mouth, a tapeworm.

I'm currently making another batch of it and plan on feeding my dog the cheese once again.

Essentially the good bacteria goes in and gets rid of the "bad guys", and the stink should go away considering that animals, and people, stink because their gut flora is full of bad guys because of the foods being consumed.

Post Sat Dec 24, 2016 8:39 pm
IdahoHerbalist User avatar
Site Admin

Posts: 1055
How about some links to get us started in the direction you want us too. So much misdirection out there if you do not know what to search for or ask about.

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