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Dandelion Flowers, Topical Use

General discussion of medicinal plants and their use.

Post Tue Jun 06, 2017 7:39 pm

Posts: 225
Okay, so I know dandelion roots and leaves are good medicine internally, and even in a poultice, but what about the flowers? I've heard of using the flowers in dandelion wine.... The reason I'm asking is I'm wondering if the dandelion flowers can be used in topical preparations the same way calendula can.

Anyone know? Anyone want to speculate or put out a hypothesis? Meanwhile, I am about to experiment on myself. I will report back what I learn.

Post Tue Jun 06, 2017 10:00 pm

Posts: 225
Okay, so I put just a hair under one cup (not packed) of fresh picked flowers into a measuring cup and poured hot water over it. I covered it and let it steep a good 15 minutes or so (until cooled to tepid). I strained off the tea and poured into a spritzer bottle. I spray into my rash whenever it starts to itch, and it worked! One spot is very persistent, so I had to let it dry and reapply several times until it finally stopped itching. So now I have a substitute for calendula that is more readily available, and in abundant supply.

Besides myself, I want it for my grand nephew, who has some eczema on his scalp. I figure his mama can spray it on as a hair and scalp tonic, that won't get his hair all goopy.

Post Wed Jun 07, 2017 4:11 am
IdahoHerbalist User avatar
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Posts: 1098
When I first read it I was wondering why you were putting a hair under a cup.... :scared:

Post Wed Jun 07, 2017 2:38 pm

Posts: 225
:LOL: it DOES look a bit confusing at first, doesn't it? (Cue the witch's dance). :rofl: I just have to say, I am just so tickled to find an effective anti-pruitic remedy that is safe, natural, effective, has no side effects like topical steroid creams do, and is also FREE for the picking! I could stop practicing herbalism right now, I am that thrilled and relieved. (But I won't--this is just the tip of the iceberg, I'm sure.)

Post Wed Jun 07, 2017 6:37 pm
IdahoHerbalist User avatar
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Posts: 1098
anti-pruitic

Is that one of the witch's chants?

We try to not use fancy words around these parts. :confused:

Post Wed Jun 07, 2017 8:07 pm

Posts: 225
Pruitis: fancy dermatologist word for itchy skin

Anti pruitic: anti itch

For those who haven't seen a dermatologist in awhile. :wink:

Post Thu Jun 08, 2017 3:19 am
IdahoHerbalist User avatar
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Posts: 1098
Just say itch and anti itch then!!! :face palm 2:

Post Thu Jun 08, 2017 3:40 am

Posts: 225
Sorry, I've seen the term on bottles of lotion at Wal-Mart. I thought everybody was familiar with the term. :blush:

Post Thu Jun 08, 2017 12:56 pm
IdahoHerbalist User avatar
Site Admin

Posts: 1098
Please, no need to be SORRY! HUMOR ALERT! :big grin: Lots of uneducated rednecks, well one anyway (me), that frequent this place.

Post Thu Jun 08, 2017 1:19 pm

Posts: 225
Okay, from now on when I use fancy doctor words, I'll break them down, just for you. :wink:

I thought I should add a bit of clarification to condition in using the dandelion flowers for, To help others who want to try it:

My rashes are triggered by accidental ingestion of foods containing wheat, which I am allergic to. In this case, imitation crab was my undoing. :irked:

My rash is MOIST, red, bumpy, inflamed, hot, itchy.

The dandelion is apparently astringent. It dried the hot spots out, and stops the itching (so I'm not tempted to scratch, which is the first step to healing). It is now beginning to scab over, and patches of new skin are becoming apparent as the middle of the rash slowly disappears, leaving a crusty outer edge.

I thought this information would be helpful to know, since there are different types of rashes, requiring different treatment.

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