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Local Adaptogens (and Adrenal Fatique)

General discussion of medicinal plants and their use.

Post Mon Mar 02, 2015 10:15 pm

Posts: 69
It seems that most of the adaptogens come from exotic parts of the world. If we needed to make a formula to support, say adrenal function, what herbs that grow in the western US would be suitable? (Sorry Faye!) :smile:

Post Mon Mar 02, 2015 10:48 pm
Doc Jones User avatar
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Posts: 951
The only "local" adrenal herb that comes to mind is licorice. Glycyrrhiza lepidota is the local version and should work as well as the Asian G. glabbra.

Here are some pics:

https://www.google.com/search?q=glycyrrhiza+lepidota&espv=2&biw=1113&bih=579&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=huj0VLzvBMO5mAXU6ID4BA&ved=0CAYQ_AUoAQ

Doc

Post Tue Mar 03, 2015 2:06 am

Posts: 69
How do you feel about long term use of licorice, if there is no underlying problem with blood pressure? Some formulas have mullein in them to help with glands, but I'm not sure if it is a good stand alone.

Post Tue Mar 03, 2015 3:43 pm
Doc Jones User avatar
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Posts: 951
SageWoman wrote:
How do you feel about long term use of licorice, if there is no underlying problem with blood pressure? Some formulas have mullein in them to help with glands, but I'm not sure if it is a good stand alone.


If we're talking about adrenal fatigue specifically, I think it's important to define what that means exactly.

Adrenal fatigue is sort of a "catch all" phrase that holistic healers use to describe a condition of physical and emotional exhaustion. It may or may not have anything to do with the adrenal glands (though often it does). Addressing the adrenals specifically isn't usually the answer.

When I get a client in this condition I approach it on three fronts...

Nutrition
Emotional adaptations
Exercise
Herbs

Nutrition:

Make sure the person is eating well. Breakfast is particularly important. Quality fats and proteins are particularly important and making sure the carbs being eaten are mostly complex green ones rather than starchy, white ones (broccoli not bread). B vitamins, especially B12 are really important as are minerals like magnesium and selenium. VIt D3 is helpful too.
One great way to get some of the nutrients needed is by the regular use of bone broth as well as fermented foods.
Herbs that can be helpful in this are Nettles, Alfalfa, Burdock, Dandelion and any of the other deep-rooted plants. These can be used every day, long term.

Emotional Adaptations:

Most of these folks are emotionally stressed. This puts them in a sympathetic "Fight or Flight" mode which is exhausting and cannot be maintained long-term without some serious health consequences. Lifestyle changes are often needed. They need to give some things up whether it be activities, aims or attitudes. Emotional release therapies can be a real blessing for some folks. Prayer, meditation, yoga and other activities that center the mind and relax the body are very useful. Deep, intentional breathing can do wonders.

Exercise:

If the person is able, exercise is also a valuable tool. Mild to moderate exercise is one of the best ways to physiologically reduce stress. If they can't exercise, have them get a LifeTime Vibe Machine. http://lifetimevibe.com/ Tell 'em Doc Jones sent you.

Herbs:

Licorice, Ashwaganda, Nettle seed, Nettle leaf, Siberian ginseng are very helpful. One of my other favorites is Oat straw. It is the best thing in the for frazzled nerves and emotional exhaustion. For acute issues of anxiety/stress, Valerian, Chamomile, skullcap, or other relaxing nervines can be a real blessing.

Remember too that most of these folks have been wearing themselves out for years. It usually takes several months to get them feeling good again. Be patient and persevere.


Posts: 69
I'm seeing more and more people who are frazzled by life, just as you said. My husband and I serve 2 days a week at our local food bank and I come in contact with so many who are down and out and ready to give up. I'd like to take them home and use your protocol to help them get back to function again. Thanks for your thoughts.

It occurs to me that if we ever have a societal collapse, this type of fatigue will be a real problem. That is one reason I asked for ideas of adaptogen herbs that grow in the west. In a collapse situation, the stockpile of herbs that I have put away could be quickly depleted. I would need to forage close to home.

Doc Jones User avatar
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Posts: 951
SageWoman wrote:
I'm seeing more and more people who are frazzled by life, just as you said. My husband and I serve 2 days a week at our local food bank and I come in contact with so many who are down and out and ready to give up. I'd like to take them home and use your protocol to help them get back to function again. Thanks for your thoughts.

It occurs to me that if we ever have a societal collapse, this type of fatigue will be a real problem. That is one reason I asked for ideas of adaptogen herbs that grow in the west. In a collapse situation, the stockpile of herbs that I have put away could be quickly depleted. I would need to forage close to home.


In the apocalypse, the deep-rooted stuff will be your friends...Burdock, Red Clover, Alfalfa, Dandelion, Nettles...Oat straw and valerian are easy to grow. Ashwagandha can be grown as an annual here.

Doc

Post Sat Mar 07, 2015 8:05 pm
IdahoHerbalist User avatar
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Posts: 1066
Doc Jones wrote:
Remember too that most of these folks have been wearing themselves out for years. It usually takes several months to get them feeling good again. Be patient and persevere.

That is why soooooo many go to the Dr (legal or otherwise) for the UPPERS and SEDATIVES! They want the fix and they want it NOW!


Posts: 187
Location: Rexburg, Idaho
Are Burdock, Red Clover, Alfalfa, Dandelion, and Nettles considered adaptogens?

I was reading this week and some other herbs were getting the title of adaptogen and so I'm wondering if they also are:

Motherwort, Rhodiola, Chocolate (not the processed stuff), Hawthorn

IdahoHerbalist User avatar
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Posts: 1066
The first group you mention are deep rooted and/or very nutrient dense. They help you deal with stress by feeding your body.


Posts: 187
Location: Rexburg, Idaho
Ya, I thought they fit the Adaptogens definition that Doc gives, but I wanted to be sure they fit into that category.

Guido Mase' says that Motherwort, Rhodiola, Chocolate (in the raw), and Hawthorn are also Adaptogens. So I'm wondering if that is true.

Thanks for your help.

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