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Mulberry tree

General discussion of medicinal plants and their use.

Post Tue Jan 13, 2015 9:30 pm
Fey

Posts: 179
I've read somewhere that mulberry fruits are very high in vitamin B 17 which is supposed to be strongly anti cancer. There's also a lot of information on the net about its anti diabetic actions.


Food and Medicine Uses of Mulberries in Azerbaijan

When mulberries are no longer in season, Azerbaijanis still enjoy eating them in the form of mulberry syrup concentrates known as doshab and bakmaz. To make the syrup, mulberry juice is boiled until it has a consistency that's much like honey.

While this syrup makes a tasty sweet, it is also used as a medicine to protect against diseases of the liver, gall bladder, and heart. To treat gallbladder infections, one is supposed to drink 2 tablespoons of bakmaz dissolved in half a glass of water, then lie down in bed on his or her right side. The treatment should be taken on an empty stomach, half an hour before breakfast. Bakmaz is used to treat sore throats as well. Tut araghi, a potent liqueur made from mulberry juice, is another mulberry product that's very popular-not only Azerbaijan, but also in Georgia and Armenia. It's one of the national Azerbaijani versions of vodka. Some people believe that small doses of the drink protect against diseases of the stomach and heart.


Mulberry fruit is classified in the modern Chinese Materia Medica as a blood tonic, and is listed along with herbs having similar traditional uses such as ho-shou-wu (Polygonum multiflorum, root), cooked rehmannia (Rehmannia glutinosa, root), ligustrum (Ligustrum lucidum, fruit) and lycium (Lycium chinensis, fruit). Traditionally, mulberry fruit has been used as a medicinal agent to nourish the yin and blood, benefit the kidneys, and treat weakness, fatigue, anemia, and premature graying of hair. It is also used utilized to treat urinary incontinence, tinnitus, dizziness, and constipation in the elderly and the anaemic.

Mulberry contains plentiful nutritious elements, such as minerals and vitamins; it can cure chronic diseases of the digestive tract, promote gastric juice secretion, strengthen the ability for digesting and assimilating, improve the appetite, and eliminate abdominal distention and constipation. Mulberry is suitable also for chronic gastritis and chronic hepatitis.

For more info: http://www.itmonline.org/arts/morus.htm

Morus leaves are sweet and cooling like the fruit, but also have a bitter flavor. The leaves enter the Liver and Lung meridians, where the cooling and bitter properties remove externally contracted heat conditions (as occurring with a cold or the flu) with symptoms such as fever, sore throat, headache, sore-watery eyes and cough.

Mulberry leaves are also used to stop bleeding in patients who are vomiting blood. Western studies have shown that decoctions made from fresh mulberry leaf can inhibit several bacteria including Staphyloccocus aureus, Escherichi coli, and hemolytic streptococcus. New research shows that mulberry leaf extracts may play a role in the management and treatment of diabetes.

Similar to the leaves of this plant, Morus root bark is sweet and cold in nature and enters the Lung meridian. The difference between Morus leaves and the root bark is that the latter is indicated for coughs that have hot phlegm. In Chinese medicine, hot phlegm occurs when the body's physiological fluids in the Lung are heated and congealed in reaction to a pathogen. The phlegm can then turn white, yellow, green, or even gray depending on the severity of the heat.

Morus root bark has the ability to help the body transform the pathological phlegm with a downward directing function, which settles coughs and wheezing and facilitates urination to eliminate excess fluid. In fact, this herb is commonly used for the treatment of edema, especially when it is around the eyes.
http://ashevilleacupuncture.blogspot.co ... ee-in.html

Post Tue Jan 13, 2015 9:38 pm
Fey

Posts: 179
And when silkworms are fed on mulberry leaves, you've got........

SILKWORM POO AS MEDICINE!!!! :crazy: :barf:

Because of its sweet, acrid and warm qualities, the silkworm fecal matter is effective for the treatment of pain in the extremities and abdomen caused by Wind and Dampness. Chinese medicine considers this type of pain in the extremities as Wind-Damp Painful Obstructive Syndrome. Wind refers to the tight or pulling nature of the pain (like a spasm) and the dampness to the swelling in the joints, which is often exacerbated by damp environments or damp weather. The silkworm's fecal matter has a warm quality, is able to dry the damp obstruction and the acrid quality helps increase the blood flow to eliminate muscle aches and pain.

Believe it or not, silkworm fecal matter is also used in Chinese medicine to harmonize the stomach. Its sweet flavor harmonizes the stomach, and the warm and pungent properties help eliminate any fluids that may be obstructing the normal flow and function of the stomach. For these reasons, this herb can stop abdominal cramping and transform the dampness that is inherent in diarrhea and vomiting. Finally, this herb is commonly used to treat itchy skin and eczema. The acrid and warm properties help bring blood to the skin, dry the secretions and promote healing.
http://ashevilleacupuncture.blogspot.co ... ee-in.html

Post Wed Jan 14, 2015 2:43 pm
Doc Jones User avatar
Site Admin

Posts: 951
I used to have a couple of large mulberry trees in my yard but had to take them down because they wanted to fall on my house. :(

I've meant to replace them because there isn't anything on them that isn't medicinal. Great plant.

Doc

Post Wed Jan 14, 2015 9:55 pm
Fey

Posts: 179
I grew mine from cutting. I planted them too close to the house and now the flying foxes keep us awake at night during spring when the fruit ripens. (I've heard that in some countries they ripen in summer) Flying foxes poop on our roof affecting our rain water supply. They carry the deadly hendra virus and lyssavirus and are in plague proportions, but they are protected by law. Not even allowed to make a noise to move them on.
We have so much fruit from them (five) that the chooks can't eat the ones that drop. I've got a bag for harvesting that goes over my head and hangs around the level of my waist. That way I can pick with two hands.
Once the flying foxes come in, it's useless to pick. They puke and poop on all the remaining fruit and anything else in spit- and bowel-shot. :barf:
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Post Wed Jan 14, 2015 11:49 pm
IdahoHerbalist User avatar
Site Admin

Posts: 1072
Don't you just love government helpfulness. They seem to care more about other things than the people that they represent. You can bet if it affected them they would be doing something to make a change! :wall:

Post Thu Jan 15, 2015 12:25 am
Doc Jones User avatar
Site Admin

Posts: 951
Fey wrote:
I grew mine from cutting. I planted them too close to the house and now the flying foxes keep us awake at night during spring when the fruit ripens. (I've heard that in some countries they ripen in summer) Flying foxes poop on our roof affecting our rain water supply. They carry the deadly hendra virus and lyssavirus and are in plague proportions, but they are protected by law. Not even allowed to make a noise to move them on.
We have so much fruit from them (five) that the chooks can't eat the ones that drop. I've got a bag for harvesting that goes over my head and hangs around the level of my waist. That way I can pick with two hands.
Once the flying foxes come in, it's useless to pick. They puke and poop on all the remaining fruit and anything else in spit- and bowel-shot. :barf:


Giant fruit bats flinging poo and puke as you try to harvest your mulberries ehhh? And I thought bugs eating the balsamroot seeds before I could get to them was a pain.

Doc

Post Sat Jan 31, 2015 2:27 am

Posts: 69
You all make me laugh! :Laugh:


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