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Purple Loosestrife

General discussion of medicinal plants and their use.

Post Mon Jan 12, 2015 4:47 am
Fey

Posts: 179
Lythrum salicaria:

I'm glad this pretty plant is a medicinal herb. It's a good reason to grow it.

Purple loosestrife offers great potential as a valuable and practically useful medicinal, possessing an admirable balance of astringent and mucilaginous properties. This may seem odd if you think of astringents as being drying and mucilage as being moistening, but remember that astringents do not dehydrate tissues, they tighten and restore tone to them, and in doing they lessen oversecretion. So purple loosestrife restores tone to tissues while also bathing them in a soothing mucilage, which eases inflammation and ensures lubrication. I find that including more leaves and stems in preparations yields a more astringent medicine, while collecting mostly the flowering spikes increases the presence of mucilage in water based preparations.

Purple loosestrife has been studied with regards to its antimicrobial actions. In particular, it was found to be highly effective against Candida albicans, (especially for topical applications)

Beyond that, Purple Loosestrife possesses the incredible virtue of phytoremediation, which is to say that it can accumulate environmental pollutants (such as PCBs) and break them down into inert compounds.

http://www.herbcraft.org/loosestrife.html

Purple loosestrife also provides an excellent eyewash. Maude Grieve writes in her Modern Herbal that "It has been stated to be superior to Eyebright for preserving the sight and curing sore eyes, the distilled water being applied for hurts and blows on the eyes...". The presence of mucilage makes purple loosestrife an excellent herb, as well, for soothing dry eyes, or any ophthalmic irritation or infection characterized by dryness.


Conrad Richter, of Richter's Nursery in Canada, offers these additional insights: "Most people are surprised to learn that purple loosestrife has very potent hypoglycemic and hepato-protective properties. Simple alcoholic extracts were demonstrated to have these effects on laboratory animals a few years ago. For example, animals treated with carbon tetrachloride, a compound very damaging to the liver recovered almost completely when treated with purple loosestrife. In animals treated to induce diabetes, purple loosestrife brought blood sugar down to normal."


It is well established in chronic diarrhoea and dysentery, and is used in leucorrhoea and blood-spitting. In Switzerland the decoction was used successfully in an epidemic of dysentery. It has also been employed in fevers, liver diseases, constipation and cholera infantum, and for outward application to wounds and sores.
http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/l/loopur40.html

Here are my babies;
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Post Wed Jan 14, 2015 2:56 pm
Doc Jones User avatar
Site Admin

Posts: 931
We have a similar-looking plant from the same order (Mytrales) but a different family that lives around here that is also quite good for yeast infections. It's called fireweed (Chamerion angustifolium). It's a really good anti-inflammatory too.

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I'll have to keep my eyes open for the loosestrife. It's supposed to be in every state in the USA and is one of the invasive species that governments get excited about.

Having abundant mucilage and good astringency in the same plant is handy. Those two properties combined with the anti-yeast component would likely make this a great choice for canine ear infections. I've been meaning to try the fireweed on doggy ears for the longest time but haven't gotten it done. I'll tell Steven...he'll make me do it! :)

Doc

Post Wed Jan 14, 2015 10:39 pm
Fey

Posts: 179
Wow they do look alike! It's easy to see they're related. Can you send me some seeds?

I've got another herb that is related to yours....Epilobium parviflorum, (small flowering willow herb) It doesn't look anything like a relative though. I haven't got a clear picture yet. I can't get the camera or the phone to zoom in close enough to get details of the flower and its colour.

I got this photo from the net http://www.purpleloosestrife.org/faq/ showing some of the differences between Loosestrife and Fireweed. It looks like Fireweed has the same type of seed pods as Small flowering willow.
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Post Thu Jan 15, 2015 12:32 am
Doc Jones User avatar
Site Admin

Posts: 931
Fey wrote:
Wow they do look alike! It's easy to see they're related. Can you send me some seeds?

I've got another herb that is related to yours....Epilobium parviflorum, (small flowering willow herb) It doesn't look anything like a relative though. I haven't got a clear picture yet. I can't get the camera or the phone to zoom in close enough to get details of the flower and its colour.

I got this photo from the net http://www.purpleloosestrife.org/faq/ showing some of the differences between Loosestrife and Fireweed. It looks like Fireweed has the same type of seed pods as Small flowering willow.


Fireweed used to be in the genus Epilobium but they moved it. Nowadays, since all the plants are named, the only way to get a Ph.D. in botany is to rearrange things and give them new names. :face palm 2:

Doc

Post Wed May 30, 2018 2:55 pm

Posts: 179
Location: Rexburg, Idaho
Regarding the fireweed: How long would you suggest taking it for candida?

Post Wed Jun 06, 2018 11:29 pm
Doc Jones User avatar
Site Admin

Posts: 931
annett wrote:
Regarding the fireweed: How long would you suggest taking it for candida?


Couple of weeks.

This works too:

Candida Formula

During that time, don't eat anything sweet, starchy or fungal.


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